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Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

PGP, Pretty Good Privacy, is an encryption service that is used to protect your most sensitive data on your personal computer.

It’s used to encrypt data when you want to fiddle with the dark web. However, it’s not recommended to use OS X for any dark web related activities. But since you are here, and you’ve made your decision, here is a tutorial on how to use PGP with OS X.

How to Install PGP on OS X 

First of all, we need to install GPG Suite Beta 5. You can download this tool here.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Once you open the downloaded file, you should see these two options on your screen. Select “Install” at this screen.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Complete the installation steps within the wizard. Once successfully installed, you should see this screen, which can close as well. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Create a Keypair

Creating a keypair on the GPG Suite is extremely easy. We will be using 4096 bit length for our encryption purposes.

Just open the GPG keychain. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Click the option that says New

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

A popup window would appear. Click the arrow next to the option that says “Advanced Options” and make sure that the key length appears to be 4096. 

Uncheck the option that says “key expires.” 

Enter your full name in the username field, put your email, and create a secure passphrase.

Once you have filled all the fields, click on “Generate Key.”

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

GPG Keychain should now begin to generate your key. At this point, you want to generate random data to create entropy for a secure key. You can move your mouse around, type random stuff on a text editor, and even have something downloading in the background. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Once the process is complete, your keypair is created.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Setting Up the Environment 

The difference between using other software and OS X is that the GPG suite won’t provide an encrypt/decrypt window on its own. So we are going to enable some options first.

Head over to system preferences and click on “Keyboard.”

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Once you are at this window, select Keyboard Shortcuts

Click on “services” in the left pane and scroll down in the right pane to the subsection labeled “Text” and the OpenPGP options. 

Finally, it’s time to create some keyboard shortcuts. 

Here, we will uncheck every OpenPGP option under “Text” and also delete their shortcuts. Next, we will enable “Encrypt”, “Decrypt”, and the “Import Key” options. You can create keyboard shortcuts for these if you wish. 

You can also close the window.          

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Obtaining Your Public Key

Open the GPG keychain and select your key and click export, which is at the top left corner. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Now give it a name, making sure that the option that says “include secret key in exported file” is unchecked and then click save.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Open any text editor. Browse to where you saved the key and open it. You will find your public key here. Copy and paste this key to your market profile.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Obtaining Your Private Key

Click export at the top of the window. Keep the given file name. And don’t forget that the option that says “include secret key in exported file” is Checked and then click save.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Just make sure to keep this file in a safe place and never forget your passphrase. You can never obtain it once you lose it.

Importing a Public Key

Just find the key you want to import. 

Copy everything from “–BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK –” to “–END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK–”. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Paste it into any text editor. Highlight everything, go to services after right clicking, and then go to “Open PGP: import key”.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

A pop confirmation message will appear, just hit the OK button. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

To confirm, open up the GPG keychain and see if the key appears there.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Importing a Private Key

Open GPG keychain and click on import.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Find your key and then click it. Click “Open”, it should have a .asc extension.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

A confirmation popup will appear. Click the Close button. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Encrypting a Message

Open any text editor and write a message.

Highlight your message and right click with your mouse. Find services and then click “OpenPGP: Encrypt” 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Select who you are sending this message to on the window that appears next. You can also sign your message with your key if you wish. Click OK. 

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Just copy everything here and send it to the recipient.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Decrypting a Message

Decrypting a message is also just as simple as encrypting one. Open a text editor and paste your message.

Highlight everything, right click using your mouse, go to “services”, and click “OpenPGP: Decrypt”.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Enter your passphrase on the popup window that appears.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

Voila! You have successfully decrypted your message.

Your Last PGP Tutorial for OS X

The Bottom Line

Here is your tutorial for using PGP with OS X. However, note that OS X is NOT recommended to be used for such activities because of privacy issues. If you are going to use this method, just make sure that you know enough about what you’re doing. 

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